Black Men Honored for Doing Sewa at Kenyan Gurdwara

This story via Kenyan KalaSinghas Facebook Page

They wear turbans, prepare and serve langar (dining spiritually as one, regardless of faith, culture or colour), even…

Posted by kenyankalasingha on Wednesday, October 7, 2020

They wear turbans, prepare and serve langar (dining spiritually as one, regardless of faith, culture or colour), even speak Punjabi and recite Gurbani verses. But they are not Sikhs. They may be working at Kenya’s historic and legendary Gurdwara Makindu Sahib (rooted since 1898), but the humility and high spiritedness that they exude are truly the very values of a Sikh.

Sikhi is not a missionary religion, nor does it prostelyse, but is open to anyone willing to experience it. That is why no worker at Gurdwara Makindu Sahib is compelled to become a Sikh, but rather they maintain their respective faiths and only wear the Sikh turbans while they serve in the langar kitchen, as is required in respect and honour of the principles associated with it.

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